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FAQ

General FAQ's
  1. How can you help me if you can’t get rid of my pain?
  2. My injured worker is certified unfit for work. Can they still participate in the Pain Management?
  3. I have persistent pain, why do I need to see a Psychologist?
  4. How will an Injured Worker handle a flare up when they are not at home to take their medications?


1.   How can you help me if you can’t get rid of my pain?
 

The answer is never straight forward and every individual’s pain condition is complex and will respond individually. We use an array of well-evidenced research based strategies that help manage the ongoing impact of pain. We may not be able to get rid of people’s pain however on average people report after working with us for some time that they are coping much more effectively- common examples of their improved quality of life include being less depressed or anxious, not being reliant on pain medications or other health professionals, being able to socialise again, being able to work again, their family life and relationship is much more amicable and they are able to do more things for and with their family and they feel more knowledgeable about their pain condition and hence less fearful of what is going on in their bodies.

  
2.   My injured worker is certified unfit for work. Can they still participate in the Pain Management?
 

Yes, Currently, 54% of participants start the program with an unfit certificate. Part of our assessment is to make sure that even though they are not considered fit for work yet, they are physically and mentally capable of coping with the program’s activities and 8 hour days.

Our non- completion rate of only 2.9% shows that the vast majority of participants who start the program are able to finish the program.  

  
3.   I have persistent pain, why do I need to see a Psychologist?
 

It is important to highlight that if your doctor has recommended that you see a Psychologist that this is not an indication that they think your pain is all in your head. Psychologists play a role in helping people to cope with their persistent pain and the impact on their life. Persistent pain can have a huge bearing on many areas of a person’s life and a Psychologist aims to improve these different areas. We may not be able to cure your pain, but we may be able to assist in learning to manage it and get the most out of life despite your pain.

  
4.   How will an Injured Worker handle a flare up when they are not at home to take their medications?
 

Many people with chronic pain believe that taking a lot of strong medications, avoiding activity and going to bed is the best way to handle chronic pain. This is not the case, in fact these measures only do more harm over time. The very reason a person is recommended to participate in a program is because the way in which they are currently managing their pain is overall unhelpful, which is not their fault given no doctor or other form of treatment has addressed this complex problem with them so far. That’s what Innervate wants to do so that not only they get the best advice on how to manage their flare up’s more effectively, but can learn how to do this without relying on strong pain killers.

  

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